Yii2 – What you need to know – Part II (MVC)

Yii2 – What you need to know – Part II (MVC)

In part 2 of this series I am going to look at the core MVC concepts of the Yii2 framework. The basic premise of the MVC structure of the Yii2 framework remains the same as that of Yii1.1. This can be seen in the picture. But when we delve deeper into the constructs of the MVC structure, we find a plethora of changes that will make development on the Yii2 platform a more rewarding experience. Models Models in Yii extend from the yii\base\Model class. Models are typically used to both hold data and define the validation rules for that data

Yii2 – What you need to know – Part I

Yii2 – What you need to know – Part I

Introduction The Yii project had started on  January 1, 2008, by some of the developers that were responsible for the PRADO framework. Their vision was to improve upon the PRADO framework and address all of it’s shortcomings. On December 3, 2008, Yii 1.0 was formally released and quickly became a major force in the huge ocean of PHP frameworks due to its performance, ease of use and adherence to some of the best practices of the industry at that time. Over time, as development on the PHP language itself picked up steam and new and more modern features got added, the developers

How to Leverage HTML5 for your Business

HTML5 is the newest hyper text markup language for websites from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The first draft was made public in 2008, but not much happened until 2011. In 2011, HTML5 was released and people started writing about it and using it, but the support in different browsers was still poor. Today all major browsers (Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Opera, IE) offer HTML5 support, therefore the newest HTML technology can be used at its best today. HTML5 works with CSS3 and is still in development. W3C plans to release a stable version next year, but it still looks

How To Use Kanban To Improve Your Software Development Process

Kanban, which literally translates approximately into signboard, was originally a scheduling system for lean and just-in-time (JIT) production was perfected at the inspirational Toyota manufacturing plants. Kanban is a system to control the logistical chain from a production point of view, and is not an inventory control system. Kanban was developed by Taiichi Ohno, at Toyota, to find a system to improve and maintain a high level of production. Although perfected primarily with manufacturing process in mind, the same principles can be applied equally effectively in the software development process as well. Software Development Although originally devised for the manufacturing